Press – Aquarium Fish Advisor

PRESS ON Dr Thomas R. Reich PhD and Aquarium Fish Advisor:

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Florida Pond Management Announces New Program; Control Mosquitoes the Natural Way
PRWebAfter years of research Florida Pond Management announces a new program designed to control mosquitoes in backyard ponds without chemicals.Thomas R. Reich PhD explained “Aquarium fish do not always have to be kept in heated tanks under totally controlled environments. Many native fish of temperate and sub-tropical climates are species of tropical fish, which can be kept and will thrive and breed in outdoor ponds if certain conditions are met. “
1) The average temperature is consistently over 60 F and average air temp is over 70 F in the day time.
2) The pond is at least partially submerged in the earth, which “normalizes” the average temperature within the body of water.
3) The pond has sufficient plants so the fish can seek shade from the intense summer sun.
4) The water level is kept up with either rain water or aged water, not directly from a garden hose
5) Grass clippings are not allowed to fall into the pond, since this risks cross contamination by pest control substances or fertilizers that could poison the fish and plants in the pond.
6) Until the fish are established in nature, feed them once a day with general fish food, similar to what you would feed them in an aquarium.
7) Relax its easier than it sounds.”As long as tropical fish are put outside in ponds and fountains of sufficient depth after all fears of frost are over and brought back inside early in autumn before temperatures drop below 60 F many species can thrive in the summer ponds of temperate and subtropical climates,” Reich continued.
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Florida Pond Management Announces New Program; Control Mosquitoes the Natural Way
PRWebAfter years of research Florida Pond Management announces a new program designed to control mosquitoes in backyard ponds without chemicals.Thomas R. Reich PhD explained “Aquarium fish do not always have to be kept in heated tanks under totally controlled environments. Many native fish of temperate and sub-tropical climates are species of tropical fish, which can be kept and will thrive and breed in outdoor ponds if certain conditions are met. “
1) The average temperature is consistently over 60 F and average air temp is over 70 F in the day time.
2) The pond is at least partially submerged in the earth, which “normalizes” the average temperature within the body of water.
3) The pond has sufficient plants so the fish can seek shade from the intense summer sun.
4) The water level is kept up with either rain water or aged water, not directly from a garden hose
5) Grass clippings are not allowed to fall into the pond, since this risks cross contamination by pest control substances or fertilizers that could poison the fish and plants in the pond.
6) Until the fish are established in nature, feed them once a day with general fish food, similar to what you would feed them in an aquarium.
7) Relax its easier than it sounds.”As long as tropical fish are put outside in ponds and fountains of sufficient depth after all fears of frost are over and brought back inside early in autumn before temperatures drop below 60 F many species can thrive in the summer ponds of temperate and subtropical climates,” Reich continued.”Some of the oldest varieties of aquarium fish are called tropical fish but come from more temperate climates, and survive very nicely in unheated aquariums. The Paradise Fish (Macropodus opercularis) and the White Cloud Mountain Minnow (Tanichthys albonubes) are good examples of heartier species of tropical fish that do not need the warmth that an Angle Fish needs, for example,” explained Dark Water Aquatics of Orlando Florida.

Read more here: http://markets.financialcontent.com/mi.sacbee/news/read/26831175/Florida_Pond_Management_Announces_New_Program#storylink=cpy

 

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Florida Pond Management Announces New Program; Control Mosquitoes the Natural Way

PRWebAfter years of research Florida Pond Management announces a new program designed to control mosquitoes in backyard ponds without chemicals.Thomas R. Reich PhD explained “Aquarium fish do not always have to be kept in heated tanks under totally controlled environments. Many native fish of temperate and sub-tropical climates are species of tropical fish, which can be kept and will thrive and breed in outdoor ponds if certain conditions are met. ”

1) The average temperature is consistently over 60 F and average air temp is over 70 F in the day time.
2) The pond is at least partially submerged in the earth, which “normalizes” the average temperature within the body of water.
3) The pond has sufficient plants so the fish can seek shade from the intense summer sun.
4) The water level is kept up with either rain water or aged water, not directly from a garden hose
5) Grass clippings are not allowed to fall into the pond, since this risks cross contamination by pest control substances or fertilizers that could poison the fish and plants in the pond.
6) Until the fish are established in nature, feed them once a day with general fish food, similar to what you would feed them in an aquarium.
7) Relax its easier than it sounds.

“As long as tropical fish are put outside in ponds and fountains of sufficient depth after all fears of frost are over and brought back inside early in autumn before temperatures drop below 60 F many species can thrive in the summer ponds of temperate and subtropical climates,” Reich continued.

“Some of the oldest varieties of aquarium fish are called tropical fish but come from more temperate climates, and survive very nicely in unheated aquariums. The Paradise Fish (Macropodus opercularis) and the White Cloud Mountain Minnow (Tanichthys albonubes) are good examples of heartier species of tropical fish that do not need the warmth that an Angle Fish needs, for example,” explained Dark Water Aquatics of Orlando Florida.

Goldfish and Koi have long been good pond fish, since they can even handle the icing over of water as long as liquid remains below the surface. But Goldfish and Koi are not effective in controlling mosquitoes, and tend to be a dirty fish requiring much more maintenance and filtration than smaller aquarium fish.

“One thing you must look out for are predators, larger fish like Goldfish and Koi may be attacked by cats, raccoons or even passing birds of prey. The smaller aquarium fish like guppies, platys, swordtails and mollies are so prolific however, that their constant flows of fri will outpace just about any predator, another great reason to try these mosquito eating marvels,” explained Dr. Reich.

Keeping outside summer ponds clear of mosquito larva, clear and active does not take harmful chemicals. Tait Carson Founder of Florida Pond Management added “A firm like Florida Pond Management can help you convert a stagnant body of standing water into a show piece with fountains and fish, clear of insect larva and without odor in a few easy steps. Try it the natural way, fish, live plants and aerated water is now nature intended healthy bodies of water to maintain their clear beauty.”

Tait Carson and Florida Pond Management can be contacted: 407.472.9258

Thomas R. Reich PhD can be contacted: 407.574.3550

Dark Water Aquatics can be contacted: 561.318.1195

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/04/prweb11718004.htm

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Florida Pond Management Visits Global Pet Expo; Releases Natural Mosquito Control System

PRWebFlorida Pond Management and Aquarium Fish Advisor were key players in the recent Global Pet Expo in Orlando, Florida. The topic under discussion at the Global Pet Expo, attended by over 60,000 pet industry and wildlife professionals, was natural solutions and elimination of environmentally unfriendly chemical solutions.Florida Pond Management developed a method of using mosquito fish as well as common aquarium fish like: guppies, swordtails, mollies and white cloud mountain minnows, to control mosquitoes in backyard and community ponds.
SunHerald

Aquarium Fish Advisor, a popular tropical fish website owned and operated by Dr. Thomas R. Reich, a PhD Ichthyologist based in Orlando, Florida, commented that the Florida Pond Management solution should be the solution to the mosquito control problems in all small bodies of water.

At the Global Pet Expo, in Orlando, Dr. Reich commented, “Using common aquarium fish in small ponds can seriously increase the interest in tropical fish and control mosquito infestations. At the end of the season not only are mosquitoes in check, the mosquito larva has helped grow some of the most beautiful examples of tropical fish to bring indoors for the winter, fish that will make you proud to be part of the hobby.”

BlackWater Aquatics, a store in Orlando, Florida specializing in Tropical Fish and Aquatic Plants, has a large variety of fish that eat mosquito larva. One species they recommend for the summer months is the Paradise Fish, “The Paradise Fish is a labyrinth type, air breather, in their natural environment in the rice patties of Southeast Asia. They can survive very stagnant water and thrive in almost any quality of water.”

At the World Pet Expo, Florida Pond Management and Aquarium Fish Advisors gave many tropical fish enthusiasts a lot to think about this week. With a bit of knowledge and care for the environment, we can control mosquitoes without extensive use of chemicals and promote the tropical fish hobby fish in the process.

More information on Florida Pond management can be found at:407-472-9258
Barter Rewards can be contacted at: 855-652-2783
AquariumFishAdvisor.com and Dr. Thomas R. Reich can be contacted at: 407-574-3550

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/03/prweb11694507.htm



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By: PRWeb
March 22, 2014 at 06:38 AM EDT
Florida Pond Management Visits Global Pet Expo; Releases Natural Mosquito Control System
Florida Pond Management and Aquarium Fish Advisor were key players in the recent Global Pet Expo in Orlando, Florida. The topic under discussion at the Global Pet Expo, attended by over 60,000 pet industry and wildlife professionals, was natural solutions and elimination of environmentally unfriendly chemical solutions.Florida Pond Management developed a method of using mosquito fish as well as common aquarium fish like: guppies, swordtails, mollies and white cloud mountain minnows, to control mosquitoes in backyard and community ponds.
la daily news
February 24, 2014 at 06:15 AM EST

Florida Pond Management Announces a Natural Non-Pesticide Solution to Mosquito Control

PRWebFlorida Pond Management, an organization involved in the health of fish, ponds and lakes in Florida to Louisiana, announces a non-chemical approach to Mosquito control. Tait Carson, the company’s founder explained, ” Dr. Thomas R. Reich PhD is an Ichthyologist noted for his work in aquariums and ornamental ponds around the world, he developed a way to control the mosquito larva before they even become mosquitoes, right in the ponds and lakes the way nature engineered it!”

“Florida has literally thousands of ponds and lakes, and the territory once had one of the nation’s worst mosquito population problems,” Reich explained, “One of the ways many communities have controlled the mosquito population without the ever invasive pesticides and aerial spraying barrages is to stop the mosquito at the source.”

 

 

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By introducing native Florida fish that are specialized in eating mosquito larva the problem is greatly reduced. One of the quickest fixes is the common guppy, known as the millions fish since a single pair can reproduce in the millions in a very short amount of time (given the food and space), and eat their weight in mosquito larva every day, the larva can be eliminated before they grow into mosquitoes.

“However the Guppy is not a cold hardy fish, and dies off each winter, leaving the ponds and lakes at the mercy of the ever fruitful mosquito each spring.” Reich cautioned. “But certain fish are Florida natives that are also cold hardy, or fish that are ideally suited for our weather pattern of extremely hot summers and cold but short winters.”

The most popular of the mosquito eaters is the Eastern Mosquitofish. The eat mosquito larva like their distant relative the guppy, but are cold hearty. “Several hundred or even several thousands in a medium sized lake will become millions in no time, and eat their weight in mosquito larva each day!” Dr. Thomas R. Reichremarked.

Read more here: http://markets.financialcontent.com/mi.miamiherald/news/read/26512722/Florida_Pond_Management_Announces_a_Natural_Non#storylink=cpy

 

 

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“During the Yellow fever epidemic of the past, Guppy’s and mosquito fish would be thrown into ditches to control the deadly disease which was carried by, what else, the mosquito,” Reich added.

“Many lakes have multitudes of these tiny silver gray fish on the edges of the shoreline, usually in reeds, weeds, or muck to avoid larger fish. Newer ponds developed recently will not have natures answer to the mosquito problem, and that’s where Florida Pond Management can help,” said Tait Carson.

 

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“Many lakes have multitudes of these tiny silver gray fish on the edges of the shoreline, usually in reeds, weeds, or muck to avoid larger fish. Newer ponds developed recently will not have natures answer to the mosquito problem, and that’s where Florida Pond Management can help,” said Tait Carson.

Another advantage of the tiny non-invasive Eastern Mosquitofish is the food chain. Since they breed so quickly, they become a favorite snack of pan fish and game fish. “Fishing is my sport, controlling mosquitoes and feeding sport fish sold me on Dr. Reich’s suggestion, and we are seeing a lot of potential here in Central and Northern Florida,” Carson concluded.

There are few draw backs to this natural method of mosquito control and the Eastern Mosquitofish is a totally natural approach to this stinging problem offered by Florida Pond Management.

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/02/prweb11605033.htm

ADN
By: PRWeb
February 24, 2014 at 06:15 AM EST
Florida Pond Management Announces a Natural Non-Pesticide Solution to Mosquito Control

PRWebFlorida Pond Management, an organization involved in the health of ponds and lakes in Florida to Louisiana, announces a non-chemical approach to Mosquito control. Tait Carson, the company’s founder explained, ” Dr. Thomas R. Reich PhD is an Ichthyologist noted for his work in aquariums and ornamental ponds around the world, he developed a way to control the mosquito larva before they even become mosquitoes, right in the ponds and lakes the way nature engineered it!”

“Florida has literally thousands of ponds and lakes, and the territory once had one of the nation’s worst mosquito population problems,” Reich explained, “One of the ways many communities have controlled the mosquito population without the ever invasive pesticides and aerial spraying barrages is to stop the mosquito at the source.”

By introducing native Florida fish that are specialized in eating mosquito larva the problem is greatly reduced. One of the quickest fixes is the common guppy, known as the millions fish since a single pair can reproduce in the millions in a very short amount of time (given the food and space), and eat their weight in mosquito larva every day, the larva can be eliminated before they grow into mosquitoes.

“However the Guppy is not a cold hardy fish, and dies off each winter, leaving the ponds and lakes at the mercy of the ever fruitful mosquito each spring.” Reich cautioned. “But certain fish are Florida natives that are also cold hardy, or fish that are ideally suited for our weather pattern of extremely hot summers and cold but short winters.”

The most popular of the mosquito eaters is the Eastern Mosquitofish. The eat mosquito larva like their distant relative the guppy, but are cold hearty. “Several hundred or even several thousands in a medium sized lake will become millions in no time, and eat their weight in mosquito larva each day!” Dr. Thomas R. Reich remarked.

“During the Yellow fever epidemic of the past, Guppy’s and mosquito fish would be thrown into ditches to control the deadly disease which was carried by, what else, the mosquito,” Reich added.

“Many lakes have multitudes of these tiny silver gray fish on the edges of the shoreline, usually in reeds, weeds, or muck to avoid larger fish. Newer ponds developed recently will not have natures answer to the mosquito problem, and that’s where Florida Pond Management can help,” said Tait Carson.

Another advantage of the tiny non-invasive Eastern Mosquitofish is the food chain. Since they breed so quickly, they become a favorite snack of pan fish and game fish. “Fishing is my sport, controlling mosquitoes and feeding sport fish sold me on Dr. Reich’s suggestion, and we are seeing a lot of potential here in Central and Northern Florida,” Carson concluded.

There are few draw backs to this natural method of mosquito control and the Eastern Mosquitofish is a totally natural approach to this stinging problem offered by Florida Pond Management.

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/02/prweb11605033.htm

Read more here: http://markets.financialcontent.com/mi.adn/news/read/26512722/Florida_Pond_Management_Announces_a_Natural_Non#storylink=cpy
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Florida Pond Management Announces a Natural Non-Pesticide Solution to Mosquito Control

Thomas R. Reich PhD is an Ichthyologist noted for his work in aquariums and ornamental ponds around the world, he developed a way to control the mosquito larva before they even become mosquitoes, right in the ponds and lakes the way nature engineered it!

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Dr. Thomas R. Reich explains how to rid mosquitos without pestisides

Mosquito fish eating mosquito larva.

“One of the ways many communities have controlled the mosquito population without the ever invasive pesticides and aerial spraying barrages is to stop the mosquito at the source with the Eastern Mosquito Fish

(PRWEB) February 24, 2014

Florida Pond Management, an organization involved in the health of ponds and lakes in Florida to Louisiana, announces a non-chemical approach to Mosquito control. Tait Carson, the company’s founder explained, “ Dr. Thomas R. Reich PhD is an Ichthyologist noted for his work in aquariums and ornamental ponds around the world, he developed a way to control the mosquito larva before they even become mosquitoes, right in the ponds and lakes the way nature engineered it!”

“Florida has literally thousands of ponds and lakes, and the territory once had one of the nation’s worst mosquito population problems,” Reich explained, “One of the ways many communities have controlled the mosquito population without the ever invasive pesticides and aerial spraying barrages is to stop the mosquito at the source.”

By introducing native Florida fish that are specialized in eating mosquito larva the problem is greatly reduced. One of the quickest fixes is the common guppy, known as the millions fish since a single pair can reproduce in the millions in a very short amount of time (given the food and space), and eat their weight in mosquito larva every day, the larva can be eliminated before they grow into mosquitoes.

“However the Guppy is not a cold hardy fish, and dies off each winter, leaving the ponds and lakes at the mercy of the ever fruitful mosquito each spring.” Reich cautioned. “But certain fish are Florida natives that are also cold hardy, or fish that are ideally suited for our weather pattern of extremely hot summers and cold but short winters.”

The most popular of the mosquito eaters is the Eastern Mosquitofish. The eat mosquito larva like their distant relative the guppy, but are cold hearty. “Several hundred or even several thousands in a medium sized lake will become millions in no time, and eat their weight in mosquito larva each day!” Dr. Thomas R. Reich remarked.

“During the Yellow fever epidemic of the past, Guppy’s and mosquito fish would be thrown into ditches to control the deadly disease which was carried by, what else, the mosquito,” Reich added.

“Many lakes have multitudes of these tiny silver gray fish on the edges of the shoreline, usually in reeds, weeds, or muck to avoid larger fish. Newer ponds developed recently will not have natures answer to the mosquito problem, and that’s where Florida Pond Management can help,” said Tait Carson.

Another advantage of the tiny non-invasive Eastern Mosquitofish is the food chain. Since they breed so quickly, they become a favorite snack of pan fish and game fish. “Fishing is my sport, controlling mosquitoes and feeding sport fish sold me on Dr. Reich’s suggestion, and we are seeing a lot of potential here in Central and Northern Florida,” Carson concluded.

There are few draw backs to this natural method of mosquito control and the Eastern Mosquitofish is a totally natural approach to this stinging problem offered by Florida Pond Management.

 

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